Glucosamine for Canine Arthritis
Natural Supplements for Arthritis in Dogs and Cats

Glucosamine and Chondroitin Helps to Reduce Pain and Assist Healing

Uses for dogs and cats include:
Glucosamine and Chondroitin for dog arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Wound healing
Feline idiopathic cystitis (IC), (FLUTD)
Cats straining to urinate

In many cases of degenerative joint diseases with arthritis the recent studies suggest that glycosaminoglycans and chondroitin sulfate may help reduce pain and inflammation from osteoarthritis, and assist in the healing process. It may also be beneficial in cases of urinary track disease in cats, because the lining of the bladder is made of a substance called glycosaminoglycan, the same water absorbent material that makes up the bulk of cartilage.

Dose for Dogs:
In some dogs, using glucosamine/chondroitin sulfate will be beneficial in controlling joint pain and stimulating healing; When giving a human product to your dog, the conversion is around 1200 mg of glucosamine and 1500 mg of chondroitin sulfate daily; Or proportionate to the human label dose. Another alternative, available at most grocery stores is bovine gelatin (Knox gelatin or Knox Nutrajoint) which can be added to the food (1-2 packages per feeding).

Dose for Cats:
Usually 250 mg of glucosamine and 200 mg of chondroitin daily for an adult cat. The research studies done on cats using glucosamine and chondroitin had rather poor results, in conclusion the hypothesis was, it was of little benefit in FLUTD. However 90% improvement in one group was thought to be attributed to owners switching their cats over to canned cat food. Cats should not be fed dry cat food whether they have urinary bladder disease or not.

For pets with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis we recommend a human or pet product containing a complex of glucosamine/chondroitin sulfate that also contains, green lipid or Perna mussel. We feel it to be far superior to using glucosamine/chondroitin alone. Usually you will see much faster results using this combination.

Bioavailability of oral glucosamine sulfate or N-acetylglucosamine products is excellent. Studies in dogs showed that articular cartilage had active uptake of glucosamine from the blood stream. Thus oral administration of glucosamine leads to rapid, complete absorption and uptake by all tissues, including connective tissues, in animals.

The idea of shark cartilage being better than other sources has no validity and by many, it is considered ecologically unsound to kill sharks to harvest their cartilage.

Where to Buy Glucosamine-Chondroitin sulfate
Products are available through health-food stores or as a pharmaceutical (such as Cosequin) through your veterinarian. Human products may be cheaper than products available from your veterinarian and may work just as well.

Contraindications:
Contraindicated in use with blood thinning drugs (coagulopathy)

Adverse effects:
Rarely, a few animals may experience mild GI upset with nausea, or loose stools. We have found it beneficial to introduce new supplements slowly, over several days, (by quarter amounts) and work up to the desired dose. This gives the animal's GI track the time it needs to adjust to the new addition. It also gives you a chance to monitor the animals reaction and eliminates most problems all the way across the board. This advise applies to introducing anything new into a pet's diet.

Note: Allow 6-8 weeks of treatment to see results in the animal. Some animals respond much quicker. Be patient, most pet owner give up long before the supplements have had a chance to do their work. More often than not, the results would have been well worth the wait.

Recommendations:
For keeping pets healthy the natural way, we recommend using Pet Remedy Charts, a Step-by-Step Holistic Home Healthcare System that will enable you to naturally treat your pet at home (without drugs) using safe, side effect free healing methods for
dogs, cats, horses, or birds.


Please Note: Any information given in this website is not intended to be taken as a replacement for medical advice. Anyone with an animal with a medical condition requiring veterinary attention should consult a qualified DVM practitioner or veterinary emergency care clinic.
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